2016/09/06

Palatable: Fort Saganne

Fort Saganne (1984)
Directed by Alain Corneau
Written by Louis Gardel, Henri de Turenne, Alain Corneau
Produced by Samuel Bronston, Albina du Boisrouvray
Starring Gérard Depardieu, Philippe Noiret, Roger Dumas, Michel Duchaussoy, Sophie Marceau, Catherine Deneuve, Saïd Amadis, Jean-Louis Richard
Essentially the French answer to Lean's Lawrence, this handsomely staged and shot enactment of Louis Gardel's novel narrates the military ascent of a peasant Legionnaire (Depardieu) whose valorous feats in the Saharan front secure regional French imperium and his reputation as a prominent jefe. His personal life's ironically more troublous: tragedy eventuates from a strained fraternity, and his affections are divided for a politician's spoilt and sour daughter (Marceau) and an alluring journalist (Deneuve). Depardieu's larger than life, exuding stoic heart and heroism as the dauntless officer, which is just as well: his is the only character who's adequately defined. Corneau accurately conveys France's prewar zeitgeist, but wastes his stars (especially Deneuve) by pretermitting most character development in favor of decidedly shallow relationships. Philippe Sarde's typically fine score is also mawkishly overused in ably realized yet musically overheated combat scenes that can't compare to those unforgettably silent, such as an Arab warrior's (Amadis) grisly amputation, or a lovesick valediction where Depardieu and Deneuve communicate more with a few expressions than the totality of their discourse. Ultimately, Saganne's as unsatisfying as photogenic, but its conclusion's so poignant and production's so immersive that less discriminating or demanding aesthetes may not have cause to care.
Recommended for a double feature paired with Lawrence of Arabia.

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